RPi resurrection – Pt. I – Pi-hole

Couple months ago, got to know about the Pi-hole project. It’s an ad-block server that can you can configure at the network level. That is, it can be configured as the DNS in your home router.

Of course, the benefit of network-wide ad-blocking is that it does its job in all of your home devices. If however, your router does not allow configuring a DNS — then you’d have to configure the DNS on a per-device level. While it may sound painful, but trust me, it’s worth it!

Thanks to online advertising — reading even a simple news article has become painful. While a lot of people use ad-block plugins, these plugins are, limited to browsers. How do you deal with ads on devices where one does not use the browser — e.g. while playing games, etc? That’s where a network-level ad-blocking gets an upper hand!

Okay, I just realised that I haven’t talked about why is “RPi” there in this post’s title. The thing is, I came across a post on Pi-hole as I was looking for a better (read: any) use for a legacy Pi2 — which was lying about mostly unused — thanks to it being trumped by newer Pis that I got later.

Seems being a Pi-hole server is one of the best uses that I could’ve put it to! The admin console is a rich and responsive UI, which allows your to further tweak the Pi-hole server as per your needs, for example: for explicitly allowing/denying any ad server, blocking specific keywords, etc.

Pi-hole Admin Console

Depending upon your privacy requirements, there’re also options to not log, or enable data masking/anonymise the data that is logged.

Anyway, as Apache Indian would have put it: ‘nuff said! Do go ahead and try it out this amazing project and may you bask in the glory of an ad-free world! And oh, btw, one doesn’t really need a RaspberryPi for Pi-hole — you can potentially install it on anythingandd…there’s a Docker image as well!

Tying snips.ai, Strava & Google Speech Engine

So, this happened a couple months ago, and I had lots of fun doing it (watch the video):

A detailed post would follow. (And yes, as mentioned in the video description, kindly ignore the choice of LED colours :)).

Algo fun!

One might have seen plenty of videos, animations and other alternative approaches to explain how some sorting algorithms work, but these ones take the cake. This video demonstrates Quick Sort. There are several more on the channel page, and all of them are as much fun!

My deep intrigue and excitement for eastern Europe made me like them even more. 🙂